Peas

Sweet, unassuming peas are often the first edible green that welcomes New Yorkers to spring. They perfectly embody the season: delicate little orbs of garden candy that can be dressed up or left to their own delicious devices. There are two types of peas at the farmers’ market: English (also known as “garden”) peas, which should be shelled and sugar snap (also known as “snow”) peas, which can and should be eaten with the pod. They’re both super solo, even better with a knob of grass-fed butter and a sprinkle of sea salt. But sometimes, even easygoing peas call for a little fanfare. Melissa Carll, the assistant manager at the Cambridge Food Co-Op, and Michele Youngs, the manager of food services at Honest Weight Co-Op, shared two of their favorite pea recipes.
Photography By Carole Topalian | July 08, 2016

About this recipe

Chef Melissa Carll and Marianne Pender’s Spiced Pea Dip and Pita Chips 

 
This snack recipe is easy, adaptable and much healthier than it tastes (and the heat can be easily adjusted)—and hearty enough to merit side-dish status. If you haven’t spied fresh peas quite yet, get into the spring groove with some frozen peas. This recipe was adapted from Marianne Pender’s Edamame Hummus and Spiced Pita Chips recipe, which appears in Cambridge Food Co-op’s member-collated community cookbook, the Village Store Co-Op Cookbook.
 
Serves 4–6

Chef Michelle Young’s Fog City Macaroni 

 
This recipe is a new twist on classic pasta salad, marrying the best elements of cold pasta salad and macaroni and cheese—a great comfort dish between cold and hot months. 
 
Serves 4–6

Instructions

Pea Dip
 
2 tablespoons to ¼ cup fresh lemon juice
10 ounces fresh English peas or one 10-ounce package frozen organic petite green peas, thawed
½ teaspoon sea salt
1 pinch white pepper
1½ teaspoons ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
 
Place all ingredients (starting with lemon juice) in a food processor and process until smooth. Taste and adjust seasonings and lemon juice to taste. Refrigerate up to three days. Serve with spiced pita chips.
 
Spiced Pita Chips
 
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon garlic granules
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
6 whole pita breads, cut into 8 wedges each
 
Preheat oven to 375°. Combine oil and spices in a large bowl. Add pita wedges and toss to coat. Spread wedges in a single layer on two baking sheets and bake, tossing once during cooking, until the pitas are brown and crisp, about 15 minutes. Cool completely before serving. They will keep in an airtight container for about four days.
4 cups elbow macaroni
Extra-virgin olive oil to taste
2 cups safflower mayonnaise 
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons honey
2 teaspoons sea salt
1 teaspoon pepper, black or white
1¼ pounds cheddar cheese, cut into small cubes
2 cups fresh English peas or 2 cups frozen English peas
5 stalks celery, diced small
1 bunch scallions, sliced thin
½ cup small-diced roasted red peppers
 
Cook pasta per package instructions. Run pasta under cold water until chilled, drizzle lightly with oil. Mix together mayonnaise, vinegar, honey and seasoning in a bowl. Toss together all ingredients and serve.
Subscribe
Build your own subscription bundle.
Pick 3 regions for $60